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Building Jewish in the Roman East

By Peter Richardson

Building Jewish in the Roman East
Paperback, 320 pages $39.95
Published: 1st October 2004
ISBN: 9781932792010
Format: 9in x 6in


Subjects: All Biblical Studies, Ancient History & Archaeology

Archaeology has unearthed the glories of ancient Jewish buildings throughout the Mediterranean. But what has remained shrouded is what these buildings meant. Building Jewish first surveys the architecture of small rural villages in the Galilee in the early Roman period before examining the development of synagogues as “Jewish associations.” Finally, Building Jewish explores Jerusalem’s flurry of building activity under Herod the Great in the first century BCE. Richardson’s careful work not only documents the culture that forms the background to any study of Second Temple Judaism and early Christianity, but he also succeeds in demonstrating how architecture itself, like a text, conveys meaning and thus directly illuminates daily life and religious thought and practice in the ancient world.

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

List of Tables and Illustrations

Preface


PART ONE: INTRODUCTION

1. Religion and Architecture in the Eastern Mediterranean


PART TWO: TOWNS AND VILLAGES

2. Jesus and Palestinian Social Protest in Archaeological and Literary Perspective

3. 3-D Visualizations of a First-Century Galilean Town

4. Khirbet Qana (and Other Villages) as a Context for Jesus

5. First-Century Houses and Q's Setting

6. What has Cana to do with Capernaum?


PART THREE: SYNAGOGUES AND CHURCHES

7. Pre-70 Synagogues as Collegia in Rome, the Diaspora, and Judea

8. Architectural Transitions from Synagogues and House Churches to Purpose-Built Churches

9. Philo and Eusebius on Monasteries and Monasticism: The Therapeutae and Kellia

10. Jewish Voluntary Associations in Egypt and the Roles of Women

11. Building a "Synodos . . . and a Place of their Own"

12. An Architectural Case for Synagogues as Associations


PART FOUR: JUDEA AND JERUSALEM

13. Law and Piety in Herod's Architecture

14. Why Turn the Tables? Jesus' Protest in the Temple Precincts

15. Josephus, Nicolas of Damascus, and Herod's Building Program

16. Origins, Innovations, and Significance of Herod's Temple

17. Herod's Temple Architecture and Jerusalem's Tombs

18. The James Ossuary's Decoration and Social Setting


PART FOUR: CONCLUSION

19. Building Jewish in the Roman East


Notes

Glossary

Further Reading

Indexes

Ancient Sources

Modern Authors

Sites and Places

Building Jewish is clearly and authoritatively written and is richly illustrated, making it ideal for classroom use as well as a basic scholarly resource.

—Jodi Magness, Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A must read for anyone interested in the matrix from which Christianity arose.

—Jonathan L. Reed, Professor of Religion, University of La Verne

Richardson accomplishes a remarkable task by creating a synthesis of form and function in this study of religious architecture within the context of Second Temple Judaism and early Christian literature.

—Victor H. Matthews, Professor of Religious Studies, Southwest Missouri State University

Peter Richardson (Ph.D. Cambridge University), Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, is the author or editor of eleven books on Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, including City and Sanctuary: Religion and Architecture in the Roman Near East (2002) and Herod the Great: King of Jews and Friend of Romans (1999). An experienced archeologist, Richardson is also Honorary Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.



Publication Details:


Binding:
 Paperback , 320 pages
ISBN:
 9781932792010
Format:
 9in x 6in

Imprint:
 Baylor University Press



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